URBAN WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS IMPROVEMENT THROUGH INNOVATION: ANALYSING MECHANISMS OF INSTITUTIONAL INNOVATION ADOPTION

Isaac Asare Bediako, Xicang Zhao, Kofi Baah Boamah, Ma Gao Qiang

Abstract


Developing economies are perceived to repulse innovation and rarely accept and use new inventions to solve their numerous water supply challenges. The tendency of infusing innovation and accepting institutional reforms is supposedly a precondition for the improvement of the urban water supply systems of most developing economies, especially Ghana. Infusing innovation in the water sector is not possible unless there is complete societal acceptance; knowledge, attaching value, acquiring and sustaining the new idea or invention. The social aspect of the urban water management of Ghana, to a large extent, is influenced by institutions that govern the interactions of actors. In the study, principles of receptivity framework are used to predict the acceptance of institutional innovation and its relationship with the performance of the urban water supply system in Ghana. The study reveals that all the principles of the receptivity framework significantly predict institutional innovation and the acquisition attribute currently determines institutional innovation acceptance to improve the performance of the Ghanaian urban water supply system

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